Melee’s Greatest Moments: Mew2King 6-0’s Leffen

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Mew2King is one of the longest tenured smashers in our game’s history, not just in Melee, but in all games. He has proved to perform at the very top level in Melee, Brawl and Smash 4, becoming the best in the world at the former two on multiple occasions. However, despite all his success, it seemed as if his career was finally coming to a slow end. As 2014 and 2015 rolled on, Mew2King struggled in Smash 4, suffering a character crisis after the nerfs to his previous main, Diddy Kong. While this would be bad enough, the once stable pillar he had in Melee as one of the Five Gods was also beginning to fall, as he found himself slipping further and further down the totem pole. Mew2King had finally begun losing to the up and coming Leffen, who at this point had started to establish himself as quite possibly the best player in the world. This all came to a head in a dominant display at the very first Super Smash Con.

In under 10 minutes, Leffen decimated the once proud slayer of space animals, beating him at his own game badly in one of the only times M2K has lost to a Fox multiple times in a row on Final Destination. The domination continued with another decisive 3-1 victory in Grand Finals, and it seemed Leffen had finally figured Mew2King out. Leffen even made an infamous tweet about the event, claiming that he had trouble¬†not three stocking Mew2King. However, while swung at the king and did not miss, the king wouldn’t stay down for long.

Enter PAX Prime 2015, a tournament once again featuring Leffen and Mew2King. Taking place a mere three weeks after the Smash Con debacle, there was no reason to think anything different would happen here. The fight was over, and Leffen had won, he had figured out the way to finally topple the King of the Mews. There was no going back now, as Leffen would continue his dominance en route to a #1 placing on the year. He had even overcome a longstanding Samus problem, decimating HugS in Winner’s Semis, a player who had defeated him earlier in the year at Press Start. Meanwhile, Mew2King scraped by in a hardfought set against Westballz, before meeting Leffen in Winner’s Finals. What follows, is legendary.

Having cycled through all his characters previously in their last set, Mew2King once again attempted this against Leffen, starting with what many would consider his 3rd best character in Fox. Leffen was well-known at this point for his strength in the Fox ditto, memories of the iconic Paragon set against Armada still ringing throughout the audience. Mew2King, however, wasn’t Armada. He was different, he played different, as his Fox looked calculated and precise, like the robotic Mew2King of old; fitting, considering this was his original main. With a shocking comeback, Mew2King clutched out the final stock and took the first game in stunning fashion. The crowd was in disbelief: could this be it?

No, of course not, Mew2King had no chance here. It was a fluke of the Fox ditto, a famously volatile matchup, and nothing more. Mew2King perhaps thought this as well and, in addition to the closeness of that game, this led to him switching to his more comfortable Sheik, a character he is well-known for today. Another exciting game ensued, as Mew2King once again fought his way back from a deficit, a heartstopping final sequence securing him another comeback and game. D1 and Blur on commentary exuding the exact emotion most of the crowd watching was, both in the venue and those watching on stream. Bewilderment, excitement, and disbelief. The King had…returned?

Game 3, Mew2King remains his patented Sheik, and this game would not need a comeback from him, nor would it be particularly competitive, as Mew2King decimated Leffen with a series of stylish plays reminiscent of him at his prime. A dominant three stock would occur as Leffen merely gave up on his final one, laughing at the result. It seemed unthinkable, but Mew2King had won, he did it! Mew2King was in Grand Finals. However, Leffen was a tough foe, and after a sound beatdown on Westballz in Loser’s Finals, Leffen was ready to take this tourney back for himself, and prove why he was the best in the world.

…Or, I guess not. While Leffen started out hot in Game 1, Mew2King made yet another amazing comeback and early gimp with his Sheik, Leffen once again laughing at the result as Mew2King went up again. Leffen seemed to have almost resigned at this point to many, and Mew2King was only picking up more steam. A switch to Marth came for Game 2, as Mew2King would stay this character for the remainder of the set. From here on out, this was the M2K show, featuring Leffen as the fortunate victim. While both games would indeed be rather close, the consistent, punishing Marth stole all the highlights, with flashy combos and kills galore. Leffen could do nothing but smile and laugh at what he was witnessing throughout the set, perhaps in disbelief, or anger…or fear at what he had awakened?

Nonetheless, with a final forward smash, Mew2King had sealed the 6-0. An iconic moment in the history of M2K’s career, and a huge turning point for it as well. At this time in his life, Mew2King looked as if he was fading from the top echelon of Smash play, that he didn’t have much more to offer. His primary game, Melee, saw him slowly falling, and he just could not find himself in the newest installment. PAX Prime was the jolt of energy he needed, as Mew2King soared to the top once more. The tournament would also be the same for Smash 4, as Mew2King found his new main in Donkey Kong, notably upsetting MVD in another solid set to watch. M2K would continue to say with us on our streams to this day at the highest level of play. What lays beyond 2019 for Mew2King is a mystery, with his continued absence at multiple tournaments throughout the year since GENESIS. One thing’s for certain though: We’re glad you’re still here.

Long live the King.

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